Ok, but…

I found this on Instagram last night, and while I did get a good chuckle, I do believe there is more than one way to look at it.

Either…it’s Zeus sticking his business where it doesn’t belong OR it’s Thor, sky god, sending love to his wife, Sif, Earth goddess.

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In like a Thunder God…

Blessed Thor’s Day!

It’s a rainy day in the greater Raleigh area.

Dios del tiempo y su carro tormenta

It seems appropriate to begin March (“in like a lion…”) with a gray, wet day.

Thor has arrived to spread his rains and quench the thirst of the ground to allow for Sif’s work to take place- to allow for growth.

Manifest gods

Friday night I was having dessert at a local pub with some of my CotE people when we started discussing manifest gods. 

Makes me think of the Joan Osborne song

What if God was one of us? 
Just a slob like one of us 
Just a stranger on the bus 
Tryin’ to make his way home?

So, the gods of old are manifested into folks living now. Their spirits are immortal, but their bodies are not. They reincarnate into new bodies and take on new personas, but continue to manifest their godly selves within that persona. 

Sounds quite a bit like…

Left right: Anders/Braggi, Mike/Ullr, Axl/Odin, Ty/Hodr, Olaf/Balder

Norse gods continue to reincarnate through decendants of Norse gods manifested who fled from the  I North to Norsewood, New Zealand. It sounds a bit silly and at times it is.  Seriously though, go watch the heck out of this show. It’s not American, so nudity and swearing is high while violence is low. 

So, manifest gods. There was talk of Odin being a school bus driver, Thor being a fighter pilot, and Loki being Tom Cruise. I believe Odin to be more suited as a truck driver, as there is much more traveling for The Wanderer. And Thor is much more blue collar. Tom Cruise I understand for Loki- he’s entertaining, but crazy as hell and totally unpredictable and uncontrollable. 

The next day, while on our 10 mile hike, Hubby and I discussed this. Hubby declared Odin would have to be a travel writer and I agree with his conjecture 2000%. Odin is the master of language. He would need to share his travels. He also believes Thor would have career status in the military and be eligible for retirement years ago, but continue to volunteer for front line infantry. 

Thinking of Witchlette’s favorites, Balder and Hod…I wonder if they would be working together. Balder the gentle, kind god. He would be one of the rare make preschool teachers. 

This got me thinking too about the goddesses. Would Frigg be more focused on wives or mothers? Would she be a general women’s advocate and cover both? Or would she be a seamstress for fashion designer? Perhaps she’s Vera Wang, known most for her wedding gown designs. What about Sif? She is to wives what Frigg is to mothers: embodiment of both, but known for one more than the other. She’s an agricultural goddess, so perhaps she’s be a farmer. Maybe a hair dresser, as she’s known more for her golden locks than anything else. All the handmaidens of which we know far too little about…

My personal goal for the remainder of 2017 is to get to know as much as I can about these mysterious figures. So much has been lost to the sands of time. I have been pointed to some resources that may help shed some light onto them. More to come!

A task and an answer

During the last Full Moon, after working with some fine ladies to call Brigid and in a moment of quiet meditation, I was given a task. Someone spoke to me, “She has another name.” 


That night, I thought and researched. I read the introduction and first myth in Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology (highly recommend it btw). I had an instinctive feeling that I had a name- her other name.

The next day I continued to feel my intuition telling me, reverberating her other name. That night, I continued with my research and my reading of NM. I had another intuitive dream with the same answer. After a week of reflection, here is my answer to the task.

Note: this is UPG and I will not be responding to debate with anyone. Don’t like it, don’t use it.

Brigid, from the Celtic Pantheon, is Sif, wife of Thor.

Sif’s name means “relation by marriage.” There is very little record of her, besides her glorious flowing hair and her relationship with Thor. No personality or function – just a familial association. There are two theories that go with her name. Either: 1) Her given name is Sif and from that there is derived “relation by marriage” 2) She has another “real” name.

The most known, best documented reference to Sif is her golden hair and is, sadly, the most meaningful detail we know about her. Many scholars have suggested that her hair is a symbol of a field of flowing grain ripe for the harvest. When viewed comparatively to other religions of the same general area and timeframe, as well as what we know about Thor, this is a logical conclusion to draw.

A common theme in nearly all ancient mythology is the sexual union between a sky god and an earth goddess to bring fertility to the land and prosperity to the crops. The sky god rains on the earth goddess and life is sustained.

While Thor is known as a warrior god, he is also known to be a rain god and a fertility god, both of the land and the womb. Thor presides over air, and therefore thunder, lightning, wind, rain, and fair weather and, thusly, fair crops.  

Many folks think of Vikings as the berserkers but actually the majority of them were marriage-minded farmers. It makes sense, then, that most of their major goddesses would be a fertility goddess of one form or another: Frigg, Freya, Fjorgyn, Jordan, and Sif.

One plant, sacred to Sif, is the Rowan tree. It is also linked to Thor, but not as strongly as the mighty oak. The Celts consider the Rowan sacred to Brigid. Brigid is a goddess mainly known for her roles over healing, poetry, and smithcraft. She is also a fertility goddess.

The similarities that I have been able to find between these two are not at all expansive but there is a lot more known today about Brigid than about Sif.

This is something noted by Neil Gaiman upon the research he did for his book. The work he did is much more expansive than I will ever be able to do, as he does this for a living and I do it as a hobby in spare time. Trusting his work, he said,

We have all of these wonderful goddesses — there’s Sjöfn and there’s Vör — and the idea that you had a doctor of the gods, I think, in terms of the giant list of missing pieces, is the one I find most interesting of all. I would love to read the story — it’s as if all of the stories that are lost are women’s stories. They’re all stories about goddesses, in which goddesses have agency, and you go, “They have to have been there, because here are all the goddesses.” And I do not believe that the women … did not tell these stories. But we don’t have any of them.