Sharing the myths II

Two weeks ago, in the morning as we were finishing packing for school/work, Witchlette asked me to tell her another “Thor story”. As I was also in the midst of other tasks, I did not put forth enough mental energy to properly pre-schoolerize the first myth which came to mind: The Mead of Poetry.

I skipped quite a few sections and didn’t give the ending the bang it deserves, and I told Witchlette so and promised I would tell it to her again at a point when I was not in the midst of packing.

Later that evening, after her lullaby, I knew I would have to run out to the pharmacy and told her so before we started signing. Witchlette asked, instead of her lullaby, if I could please tell her a Thor story. Since the pharmacy is open late, I relayed a The Treasures of the Gods and then we all sang her lullaby.

The next morning, I sat and thought about Mead of Poetry better and was able to give her a proper version of the tale. It was at this time that Witchlette’s title changed from “Thor stories” to “Asgard stories.” Over the next few nights, I relayed more and more myths to her and the new routine went from book, candle, lullabye, stay with me, bed to book, candle, Asgard story, lullabye, bed.

More recently, she has been concerned with the dark. She is frightened that she cannot see in the dark and she is worried about what she cannot see coming to get her. To try and calm her, I have relayed the relationship between the most beloved Balder and his twin brother Hod. According to many scholars, Balder did what he could for Hod- he always worked to include him and would share in his joys with him as best he could. When he was cast aside during the revelry of throwing axes and spears at Balder, Hod was left out because Balder was the target and no one else thought to include him. This is what made it so easy for Hod to fall pray to Loki.

Witchlette knows Hod before the mistletoe- the Hod that adored his brother and, while not as outgoing as Balder, is just as kind. There is nothing to be afraid of in the dark, because the dark is just Hod.

Witchlette’s response: “I like Balder better.”

 

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Balder

So, this morning I was under the impression that PBP was on “C”. I was a week ahead of myself. Oops. So the post I put up this morning about Circle Casting has been taken down (for now) and will be republished next week.

Now, on to “B”. It is a cold, grey, sleeting day in Raleigh. I need some light. Who better to help me feel the light than Balder, Norse god of light.

The following is from godchecker.com:

A champion of goodness, innocence and forgiveness, he was loved by everybody. But news has just reached us that he was killed by LOKI. The good news is that, due to extensive mourning by all earthly things, he may be brought back to life.

No. It’s failed — one old hag called Thokk has refused to weep, saying he never done nuffin for her. How did he die? Every thing in existence had promised never to harm him, thus making him completely indestructable. In fact he was so impervious to injury that at banquets guests used to amuse themselves by hurling things at him. So how did LOKI kill him? (It’s more convoluted than Agatha Christie but bear with us.)

Ah, when all the world was promising not to hurt him, there was an abstainer. Mistletoe. Yes, mistletoe. When LOKI found this out, he made a dart of sharpened mistletoe and gave it to a blind god called HOD. In the middle of a banquet, HOD with sharp ears and sharp mistletoe hit the target. Zap!

But that’s not the end of it. The old hag Thokk turns out to have been arch-villain LOKI in one of his many disguises. When confronted he tried to escape by turning into a salmon. But he was not slippery enough to escape the net and now faces perpetual punishment.

But there’s more! HOD turns out to be BALDUR’s unsuspecting twin brother. But was he full of hidden hatred? Will BALDUR return? Can HERMOTH save him from the Underworld? Can you wait for the next instalment? Stay tuned for Part Two of the Baldur Murder Mystery!